Goals for the second half of 2014

Here is my mid-year (I know I am off by couple of months) review of my blogging and learning goals for 2014. I will start off with my assessment of the first half of 2014 and then wrap with goals for the remaining four months of this year.

Status of 2014 first half goals

  1. Complete the Understanding Virtual Networks series – Finish the introductory blogs about OpenStack Networking and Open vSwitch
    • Status Update – The OpenStack networking blog was completed as per plan but I could not cover Open vSwitch in detail. But I did write a blog on KVM vs QEMU which has got very high hits. I also worked with a colleague of mine to start guest blogs on my website.
    • Score – 7/10 – This is mainly because there were some interesting blogs with lots of visits. But the area I really need to improve is writing regularly.
  2. Write two curated posts
    • Score – 0/10 – It should be obvious why I rated myself zero. I did not write any curated posts.
  3. Publish two short YouTube videos
    • Status Update – Shared my first unboxing video for Intel NUC (which will feature more in my future posts). I have the second video ready but not fully edited for sharing yet.
    • Score – 6/10 – I have given one bonus point for finally publishing my own unboxing video.

Overall Assessment – overall I would say it was a mixed bag. My blogging was definitely more sporadic but the some of the content was unique and has helped increase the number of visits. This tells me that good content is the core ingredient of a good blog. Being consistent can only make it better.

Goals for the second half of 2014

Given the delay in working out my goals, I am left with less than 4 months till the end of 2014. Given my work and personal commitment, I have to plan a realistic set of goals for blogging. The theme will center around OpenStack and also delve into the nitty gritty of setting up OpenStack lab at home. So here are some goals I have planned:

  1. Write 2 blogs related to OpenStack: I am thinking about Open vSwitch and Neutron agents
  2. Write at least one blog about setting up OpenStack infrastructure
  3. Create one YouTube video related to a networking concept.

Let me know what you think about these goals. If you have any specific idea or topic that you would like me to research and blog, please leave your comments.

  • Madhu

    Hi Sriram,

    I read your post on KVM/QEMU, but was not clear on a few things:

    KVM is a kernel module that provisions and manages hardware resources for the VMs running on the host. Along side this, KVM also comprises of drivers to support overlay functionality like l2tpv3, GRE etc.

    What I would like to know is how the guest OS or the VMs come to leverage the overlay feature of the KVM and not use their own native support, should they support it?

    Sorry for posting this here; I couldn’t an appropriate recent post to post my question.

    Thanks in advance!

    • Hi Madhu,

      Sorry for the late reply.

      The Guest OS/VM has no idea that it is actually running as a VM. The Guest OS only sees “real” HW/CPU/RAM/Network available to it. Only KVM/Qemu knows that these are actually “virtual” resources.

      Purely in terms of overlay networks, the Guest OS or VM only sees a “regular” L2 network access available to it.

      The KVM (rather Qemu) “realizes” these resources using various technologies. One thing to note: the networking functionality you mentioned is not part of KVM. You need virtual switch “alongwith” KVM/Qemu to provide overlay functionality.

      Hope this helps.